Rendering Time

martin-brennan wrote on 05/01/2019, 10:42

My Spec:

i5-2500 (3,3Ghz) ■ 16gb ram [ddr3 1333mhz] ■ 1Tb SSD ■ NVidia GeForce GT 710

Magix Movie Edit Pro Premium 18.0.1.213

rendering MP4 FullHD 1920x1080 25p

Sorry for going over "old ground", but, I've read posts where people are rendering movies where the movie length / render time is almost 1:1.

I'm trying to render 10-15 minute clips with very little effects used, and despite the usual tweaks here and there - my render times are almost double the movie length.

from what I've read, my system should render much faster than it does (my 10 minute clips taking typically 20 mins to render)

what can I do - if anything, to speed things up?

 

thanks

 

 

 

Comments

CubeAce wrote on 05/01/2019, 13:33

I have a similar system to your own and it takes my system much longer than yours (read 4 to 5 times longer) on average to render files. You could try using the HEVC codec which is quicker, (at least it is on my system) but it may heat up your processor more. I think if I'm reading things correctly around here it will depend on which processor core you use. If like mine, it's an i5 Ivy Bridge processor then your'e not going to have much luck at reducing your rendering times. If you get the rendering coming up saying that it's not using hardware encoding then you are stuck unless you either change your processor or possibly graphics card. Another possibility is that you haven't alowed MEP to use the correct hardware decoder which can be found under File / Settings / Display options / Video Mode.

Asus P8 Z68-V/GEN3 Motherboard. Intel i5-3570k CPU @ 3.40Ghz quad core. 16GB ram. Windows 7 Pro 64bit with service pack1 plus all updates. 2 x 320GB SSD drives striped for faster R/W times. WD internal SATA 7,200rpm hard drives. Total 8TB. Three external WD drives for backup. NVdia Gforce GT 1030 Graphics clock 1252Mhz Memory data rate 6008Mhz. CUDA cores 384 Memory interface 64bit Memory bandwidth 48.06 GB/s 2GB of dedicated video memory, shared sytem memory 9967MB PCi Express x4 Gen3.

wongck wrote on 06/01/2019, 05:07

Install Intel GPU driver if your mobo has Intel GPU. MEP uses Intel hardware acceleration not NVIDIA (may be at a later date it will).

Last changed by wongck on 06/01/2019, 05:07, changed a total of 1 times.

Casual home video editing just for FUN since MEP 5.5.4.1 (2006??)

  • MEP 17.0.3.177 & unused Vegas Pro 15
  • Win10 1809 on i5-4690, 8 GB, 250GB 840 EVO SSD, 4TB HDD, Nvidia GTX960 (23.21.13.8813) & an old DVD writer
  • Amateur video equipment: Sony HDR-CX675, JVC GZ-MG330
Trensharo wrote on 06/01/2019, 06:57

That's assuming that 1st gen (Sandy Bridge) QSV has support for the CODEC, Profile, and Resolution/Framerate that he needs.

Also, a lot of software does not support QSV on processors that old. It's an almost 8 year old CPU/QSV Revision. Most target Haswell and later, these days... Same for AMD VCE. A lot of software that supports VCE will only work back to a specific version breakpoint (i.e. like VCE 3.0 in VEGAS Pro), so older AMD platforms won't benefit from the hardware encoding SIP.

I would eBay a lower end GTX 900 series GPU and use that, to be honest. Like a 950 or 960 should be fine, and cheap.

martin-brennan wrote on 06/01/2019, 11:20

Install Intel GPU driver if your mobo has Intel GPU. MEP uses Intel hardware acceleration not NVIDIA (may be at a later date it will).

Hi

thanks for reply.

three of questions:

1. would this involve disabling the Geforce or enabling/running the intel GPU only for MEP work?

2. how do i tell if the board I have has the required intel GPU to do this,

3. and if it does - how do i enable this in MEP

 

cheers

Martin

 

 

CubeAce wrote on 06/01/2019, 11:50

@martin-brennan

1: Not that I'm aware of, Did you do as I suggested in my first answer?

2: and 3: It will be listed within that section of MEP if it exists when you look at answer 1 solution.

You should really look up which processor core your i5 is which will be found by going to Control Panel\. All control Panel Items\ System. and then looking up the specs on the Intel site.

I think Trensharo's suggestion of looking for an older Nvidia graphics card is possibly the best solution and one I may try myself.

Asus P8 Z68-V/GEN3 Motherboard. Intel i5-3570k CPU @ 3.40Ghz quad core. 16GB ram. Windows 7 Pro 64bit with service pack1 plus all updates. 2 x 320GB SSD drives striped for faster R/W times. WD internal SATA 7,200rpm hard drives. Total 8TB. Three external WD drives for backup. NVdia Gforce GT 1030 Graphics clock 1252Mhz Memory data rate 6008Mhz. CUDA cores 384 Memory interface 64bit Memory bandwidth 48.06 GB/s 2GB of dedicated video memory, shared sytem memory 9967MB PCi Express x4 Gen3.

martin-brennan wrote on 06/01/2019, 12:31

Hi CubeAce - your help (and others) is greatly appreciated.

As regards your suggestion, yes I tried that and: the only options i have are:

Video Output activated (unticked) ■ Allow Interlacing (unticked)

Device: Monitor 1 @NVIDIA GeForce GT710

Video Mode:

First Box: Standard Mode (direct3D, hardware acceleration) >> not selected: Compatability Mode (video for windows) / Alternative Mode (Video Mixing Renderer9)

Second Box: NVIDIA GeForce GT 710 >> not selected: Microsoft Basic render Driver

De-interlacing: No de-interlacing

greyed out: Image Formation in vertical blank (VBI)

unticked: Output to monitors with high bit depth >> Use dithering for output

 

+++++++++++++++++++++

Hi the spec I'm finding for my CPU is

Intel Core i5-2500 @3.3Ghz (Sandy Bridge)

3.3 GHz ■ Turbo clock speed3.7 GHz ■ Quad core ■ Socket typeLGA 1155

x86-64 ■ 4 threads ■ L2 cache1 MB ■ L2 cache 0.25 MB/core ■ L3 cache 6 MB

I don't know if any of that helps clarify

 

wongck wrote on 06/01/2019, 12:57

Install Intel GPU driver if your mobo has Intel GPU. MEP uses Intel hardware acceleration not NVIDIA (may be at a later date it will).

1. would this involve disabling the Geforce or enabling/running the intel GPU only for MEP work?

2. how do i tell if the board I have has the required intel GPU to do this,

3. and if it does - how do i enable this in MEP

Really depends on your motherboard.

From the wiki, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandy_Bridge

Sandy Bridge 2500 does have a GPU clock speed of 850MHz so it does suggest that the CPU comes with a GPU. But if your motherboard draws it out or not, I do not know. On mine i5 4th gen, the motherboard has DVI/VGA output and I also have an Nvidia 960. All are enabled, but I only use the Nvidia as output. The intel GPU are enabled only because of MagiX Movie Edit Pro, so that the program can tap on the hardware acceleration. I have to install the Intel GPU drivers before MEP detects the Intel GPU.

On your render properties, check if the hardware encoding selected. For example, under the Export Movie dialog, get into the Advanced setting and tick hardware encoding.

If you're using win 10, on your taskmanager, you can also check which GPU is being used by the program.

good luck.... regular experts on this forum should be able to hep you more.... or search these forums as there are several threads that talks about turning on hardware accelerations.

Casual home video editing just for FUN since MEP 5.5.4.1 (2006??)

  • MEP 17.0.3.177 & unused Vegas Pro 15
  • Win10 1809 on i5-4690, 8 GB, 250GB 840 EVO SSD, 4TB HDD, Nvidia GTX960 (23.21.13.8813) & an old DVD writer
  • Amateur video equipment: Sony HDR-CX675, JVC GZ-MG330
wongck wrote on 06/01/2019, 13:05

One such thread is this: https://www.magix.info/us/forum/no-hardware-acceleration-encoding--1205923/#ca1391373

Nothing extra, basically just tell you to go to the Intel website to get the driver. But again make sure your mobo allows Intel & nvidia GPU to be enabled at the same time. IIRC, someone on this board had a mobo that only allows one or the other, not both. So hard choice to make....

Casual home video editing just for FUN since MEP 5.5.4.1 (2006??)

  • MEP 17.0.3.177 & unused Vegas Pro 15
  • Win10 1809 on i5-4690, 8 GB, 250GB 840 EVO SSD, 4TB HDD, Nvidia GTX960 (23.21.13.8813) & an old DVD writer
  • Amateur video equipment: Sony HDR-CX675, JVC GZ-MG330
CubeAce wrote on 06/01/2019, 13:15

@martin-brennan

If it doesn't help me, then I'm sure John will have a better idea than me.

But.

In your second box try the Microsoft Basic render Driver. That is what is missing from my Ivy Bridge processor when I look at my own setup. It would be interesting to see if that works and I was hoping might work if I changed my processor to a Sandy Bridge version. Do keep an eye on your processors' heat generation though. I don't know what sort of heat dispersion you use but you really don't want to get into the 70c + region for very long periods. Your motherboard processor socket is also the same type as mine so in theory I could use the same processor as yours or upgrade to a similar i7 if this works for you, so I do have a vested interest with your inquiry:-)

It's unfortunate but understandable that newer programs make use of newer operating systems and newer processing power when it becomes available. Whenever I get a new bit of kit that needs some sort of help using a PC it inevitably means additional software support and sometimes new PC components or a completely new system to cope with the additional stress higher output resolutions and newer codecs create.

Last changed by CubeAce on 06/01/2019, 13:16, changed a total of 1 times.

Asus P8 Z68-V/GEN3 Motherboard. Intel i5-3570k CPU @ 3.40Ghz quad core. 16GB ram. Windows 7 Pro 64bit with service pack1 plus all updates. 2 x 320GB SSD drives striped for faster R/W times. WD internal SATA 7,200rpm hard drives. Total 8TB. Three external WD drives for backup. NVdia Gforce GT 1030 Graphics clock 1252Mhz Memory data rate 6008Mhz. CUDA cores 384 Memory interface 64bit Memory bandwidth 48.06 GB/s 2GB of dedicated video memory, shared sytem memory 9967MB PCi Express x4 Gen3.

johnebaker wrote on 06/01/2019, 14:45

@wongck

. . . . Install Intel GPU driver if your mobo has Intel GPU. MEP uses Intel hardware acceleration not NVIDIA (may be at a later date it will). . . .

This would only work, if it was necessary to install the drivers, for the generation 4 or later Intel processors which support Hardware Acceleration via the iGPU - ie HD4600 or later iGPU, the OP's processor is an i5-2500 which has a HD 2000 iGPU

@martin-brennan

Hi

With out knowing what the source video format is and what edits, transitions and effects you have applied the rendering times you are quoting are, IMHO, correct for rendering Full HD video with the computer processor and graphics card you have.

HTH

John EB

Lateral thinking can get things done!

VPX, MEP Premium, MEP Pro Premium, Video Pro X4, MEP 2016, and earlier versions, Music Maker Premium, Music Maker 2016, 2015.

Running Windows 10 64bit on Intel i7-8700K 3.2 GHz, 16Gb RAM, 1Tb + 2 x 2Tb internal HDD + 60Gb internal SSD, + 6 x 2Tb ext HDDs, Sony FDR-AX53 Video camera, Contour HD 1080 and Sony HDR-AS30V Sports cams.

wongck wrote on 06/01/2019, 15:34

Ah so there is a minimum Intel chip set for MEP hardware acceleration. It should spell out clearly on the box, else tons will be disappointed.

This would only work, if it was necessary to install the drivers, for the generation 4 or later Intel processors which support Hardware Acceleration via the iGPU - ie HD4600 or later iGPU, the OP's processor is an i5-2500 which has a HD 2000 iGPU

Casual home video editing just for FUN since MEP 5.5.4.1 (2006??)

  • MEP 17.0.3.177 & unused Vegas Pro 15
  • Win10 1809 on i5-4690, 8 GB, 250GB 840 EVO SSD, 4TB HDD, Nvidia GTX960 (23.21.13.8813) & an old DVD writer
  • Amateur video equipment: Sony HDR-CX675, JVC GZ-MG330
martin-brennan wrote on 06/01/2019, 17:43

Hi both @CubeAce and @wongck

■ have enabled Miscrosoft Basic Renderer with results:

uncomplicated 5m:50s video rendered @ mp4 1920/1080 25fps H264 = 3m:49s - good

slightly complicated video (with small amount of chroma and one simple title) 5m:29s - same format = 10m:05s

so asking it to do anything with a task involved still doubles the render time.

 

next step will be to enable onboard video (it has VGA socket only). However, the bios isn't responding to the usual keys; Del F1 F2 etc. The board is:

Lenovo IS6XM Rev 1 - I've contacted the vendor that I bought it off for a copy of the manaual - as this is a shop-build.

 

martin-brennan wrote on 06/01/2019, 17:52

ok, I managed to access the BIOS - there's no setting to enable the onboard GPU - only a preference order for checking what is connected.

this is strange as the board definitely has a VGA out connected.

wongck wrote on 06/01/2019, 23:51

Being an older system, looks like that's may be the best it can do.

Casual home video editing just for FUN since MEP 5.5.4.1 (2006??)

  • MEP 17.0.3.177 & unused Vegas Pro 15
  • Win10 1809 on i5-4690, 8 GB, 250GB 840 EVO SSD, 4TB HDD, Nvidia GTX960 (23.21.13.8813) & an old DVD writer
  • Amateur video equipment: Sony HDR-CX675, JVC GZ-MG330
wongck wrote on 06/01/2019, 23:52

@wongck

. . . . Install Intel GPU driver if your mobo has Intel GPU. MEP uses Intel hardware acceleration not NVIDIA (may be at a later date it will). . . .

This would only work, if it was necessary to install the drivers, for the generation 4 or later Intel processors which support Hardware Acceleration via the iGPU - ie HD4600 or later iGPU, the OP's processor is an i5-2500 which has a HD 2000 iGPU

@johnebaker

Would these type of information be on the forum sticky?

Sure beats people asking the same every now & then.

Casual home video editing just for FUN since MEP 5.5.4.1 (2006??)

  • MEP 17.0.3.177 & unused Vegas Pro 15
  • Win10 1809 on i5-4690, 8 GB, 250GB 840 EVO SSD, 4TB HDD, Nvidia GTX960 (23.21.13.8813) & an old DVD writer
  • Amateur video equipment: Sony HDR-CX675, JVC GZ-MG330
martin-brennan wrote on 07/01/2019, 00:05

is there a processor I can get for my motherboard - that will "speed things up"?

johnebaker wrote on 07/01/2019, 18:13

@martin-brennan

. . . . is there a processor I can get for my motherboard - that will "speed things up"? . . .

Processors that will fit your motherboard are obsolete and will not give you a significant boost in the speed you are looking for.

John EB

Lateral thinking can get things done!

VPX, MEP Premium, MEP Pro Premium, Video Pro X4, MEP 2016, and earlier versions, Music Maker Premium, Music Maker 2016, 2015.

Running Windows 10 64bit on Intel i7-8700K 3.2 GHz, 16Gb RAM, 1Tb + 2 x 2Tb internal HDD + 60Gb internal SSD, + 6 x 2Tb ext HDDs, Sony FDR-AX53 Video camera, Contour HD 1080 and Sony HDR-AS30V Sports cams.

martin-brennan wrote on 07/01/2019, 18:34

oh. that's a pity.

I was thinking my mortherboard IS6XM Rev 1, would take an i7-2600.

vs i5-2500 it's suppose to process/render video significantly faster - or is that just "mis-selling"?

 

 

johnebaker wrote on 07/01/2019, 19:48

@martin-brennan

Hi

. . . . would take an i7-2600. vs i5-2500 it's suppose to process/render video significantly faster . . . .

You would be no better off, it is the GT 710 that is currently doing the acceleration not the integrated graphics in the processor and the times you are getting for Full HD video are quite respectable.

Moving up to a 4th generation Intel processor, as indicated by the first digit after the hyphen, eg an i5-4xxx or i7-4xxx, if your motherboard will support one, in order to use the integrated GPU for acceleration, will not necessarily give you a really significant boost in render speeds, it depends greatly on what effects etc you use. As you add effects, collages and more complex transitions the render speed is going to drop, sometimes dramatically.

HTH

John EB

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lateral thinking can get things done!

VPX, MEP Premium, MEP Pro Premium, Video Pro X4, MEP 2016, and earlier versions, Music Maker Premium, Music Maker 2016, 2015.

Running Windows 10 64bit on Intel i7-8700K 3.2 GHz, 16Gb RAM, 1Tb + 2 x 2Tb internal HDD + 60Gb internal SSD, + 6 x 2Tb ext HDDs, Sony FDR-AX53 Video camera, Contour HD 1080 and Sony HDR-AS30V Sports cams.

Tesityr wrote on 12/02/2019, 05:27

If I may pop in, I am able to utilize hardware video encoding in MAGIX Movie Edit Pro Plus with my NVIDIX GTX 1060 via two steps (after Export Movie > Video as MPEG-4):

  • In the MPEG-4 Export panel, checkmark the "Calculate Video Effects on GPU" checkbox
  • Clicking on the Advanced button in the Export Settings area, checkmark the "Hardware Encoding" checkbox (in the Video/H.264 area)

That's it! Here is what these options look like in a Screenshot:

If these options are not available (and you are using your NVIDIA GPU as your 'main graphics adapter'), then you can try reinstalling the NVIDIA drivers (and possibly MEP) to see if it will re-detect the hardware as being available for GPU-Accelerated rendering.

 

As for your GT 710 specifically, according to the Official Matrix (Chart) for NVENC Hardware Encoding compatibility, it *should* support H.264 accelerated encoding (as long as the vendor has not specifically disabled it); it just will not support h.265 encoding:

https://developer.nvidia.com/video-encode-decode-gpu-support-matrix

 

HTH

Scenestealer wrote on 12/02/2019, 11:12

@Tesityr

"I am able to utilize hardware video encoding in MAGIX Movie Edit Pro Plus with my NVIDIX GTX 1060 via two steps (after Export Movie > Video as MPEG-4):

In the MPEG-4 Export panel, checkmark the "Calculate Video Effects on GPU" checkbox

Clicking on the Advanced button in the Export Settings area, checkmark the "Hardware Encoding" checkbox (in the Video/H.264 area)"

Hardware encoding of H.264 MP4 with MEP is just not possible via any Nvidia card since the GTX5xxx series.

The checking of "Calculate Video effects on GPU" is not the same thing as Hardware Encoding. It can speed up encoding by doing some parallel processing (acceleration) of some video effects on some machines, especially with lower performance CPU's, but this is often negligible and there have even been reports that checking that option makes exports slower.

Video Pro X has recently added H.265 MP4 hardware encoding via Nvidia cards from 9 or 10 series and this may filter down to MEP future releases.

System Specs: Intel 6th Gen i7 6700K 4Ghz O.C.4.6GHz, Asus Z170 Pro Gaming MoBo, 16GB DDR4 2133Mhz RAM, Samsung 850 EVO 512GB SSD system disc WD Black 4TB HDD Video Storage, Nvidia GTX1060 OC 6GB, Win10 Pro 1809, MEP2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 Premium and prior, VPX7, VPX11. Microsoft Surface Pro3 i5 4300U 1.9GHz Max 2.6Ghz, HDGraphics 4400, 4GB Ram 128GB SSD + 64GB Strontium Micro SD card, Win 10Pro 1903, MEP2015 Premium.

Tesityr wrote on 13/02/2019, 02:32

@Tesityr

"I am able to utilize hardware video encoding in MAGIX Movie Edit Pro Plus with my NVIDIX GTX 1060 via two steps (after Export Movie > Video as MPEG-4):

In the MPEG-4 Export panel, checkmark the "Calculate Video Effects on GPU" checkbox

Clicking on the Advanced button in the Export Settings area, checkmark the "Hardware Encoding" checkbox (in the Video/H.264 area)"

Hardware encoding of H.264 MP4 with MEP is just not possible via any Nvidia card since the GTX5xxx series.

The checking of "Calculate Video effects on GPU" is not the same thing as Hardware Encoding. It can speed up encoding by doing some parallel processing (acceleration) of some video effects on some machines, especially with lower performance CPU's, but this is often negligible and there have even been reports that checking that option makes exports slower.

Video Pro X has recently added H.265 MP4 hardware encoding via Nvidia cards from 9 or 10 series and this may filter down to MEP future releases.

Thank you for your input on the 'Calcuating Video Effects on the GPU'; however, MEP does seem to be able to render utilizing the GPU, with an NVIDIA GTX 1060 series. There are a few obvious differences during
Rendering that seem to illustrate this:

  • The video output, rendered with all GPU-acceleration options "checked", is perceptibly different [GPU-accelerated encodes tend to have a 'leather-y' look to them due to quantization, etc]
  • The Task Manager in Windows 10 shows that the DIRECT3D is Enabled (it is instigated during rendering) even so far as to indicate the GPU Engine number, if the system has more than one GPU present (in my case it was saying GPU1 when the Intel 630 iGPU was Enabled in the Mainboard BIOS and detected and designated GPU0, showing that the GTX 1060 was being utilized and not the Intel iGPU). Without any Hardware Acceleration enabled in MEP (‘checkmarked’), the Task Manager reflects this by having no “GPU xx 3D” next to the MEP Process in the list [The GPU ENGINE column must be Enabled to show this data in Task Manager]

  • The time-to-render for GPU-accelerated output is shorter than a non-hardware-accelerated encode. For example, in my testing, a non-accelerated Encode took over 2 minutes for a short clip at 1080p, whereas a fully-checked/configured accelerated Encode took just under 1.5 minutes to render the same clip, after Enabling ('checkmarking') all GPU-hardware related functions in MEP Plus
  • The “Hardware Encoding” title, in the titlebar of the “Mixing Down...” Render/Output panel, states (HARDWARE ENCODING) when all GPU-accelerated options are Enabled; and it has nothing at all after "Mixing Down...", when all of these same hardware-related options are Disabled (left uncheckmarked). [This was tested with the “Calculate Video Effects on GPU” option on, as well]
  • The Format Profile, within the data stream of the video itself (Properties of the rendered output, usually viewable with MediaInfo and other third-party programs) states a different Profile Level, when utilizing Hardware/GPU rendering, versus software-only rendering and output [showing that different analysis was possible, due to the different rendering engine utilized in MEP]
  • The output Bitrate, within the data stream of the video itself (Properties of the rendered output, usually viewable with MediaInfo and other third-party programs) states a different Bitrate, when utilizing Hardware/GPU rendering, versus software-only rendering and output [showing that different analysis was possible, due to the different rendering engine utilized in MEP]

 

It is a common misconception that since CUDA was removed from easy utilization in rendering around 2014, that many programs can no longer use GPU-accelerated (GPU Hardware) Encoding – however this is not the case for most video-related applications. Usually, a simple update in coding, on behalf of the application in question, can allow it to utilize NVIDIA’s NVENC for hardware-accelerate encodes (h.264, h.265, etc). Some companies even offer direct downloads to DLL files (Windows System Libraries, etc) that can be copied into the Windows directories, to allow CUDA encoding once more.

As well, users can always downgrade/roll-back Windows 10 Drivers to pre-340.xx NVIDIA GPU Drivers – once again allowing CUDA encoding to occur with any NVIDIA GTX GPU that was capable of it (which was something like a GT 210 and all GTX models) – I have done this personally, when wanting to utilize a specific recording application a bit back, from a company that provided DLLs as well; I was able to use CUDA encoding once more, in 2018, although now I utilize NVENC for recording and rendering today.

Unless of course, you have some official documentation from MAGIX that states otherwise [and again, this may be only superficial, as users can (1) install CUDA DLLs or (2) install older NVIDIA GPU Drivers, to enable CUDA in Windows 10] - all tests, functions and output seems to point towards full GPU-accelerated (Hardware) Rendering being capable in Movie Edit pro, as of the time of this posting (with an NVIDIA GPU (as opposed to using Intel QuickSync, which MEP does very easily and very well)). I am often wrong though and may be so here... and I apologize if I sound slightly confrontational above, I do not wish to be argumentative; I merely wish to convey to the potentially high number of readers of this Thread, that using Hardware Encoding may be possible with MEP (although users may need to do extended actions such as rolling back GPU Drivers, etc which many may not know how to do) - I am just trying to help...

wongck wrote on 14/02/2019, 00:45
 
  • The video output, rendered with all GPU-acceleration options "checked", is perceptibly different [GPU-accelerated encodes tend to have a 'leather-y' look to them due to quantization, etc]

Last year I was looking into using HW GPU for video encoding, did some stuff you mentioned like using 3rd parties DLL. It worked on MEP but I noticed that the encoded video looks worst than using sotfware only.

Later I found an article on SW vs HW encoding, can't remember where, but it has encoded ducks and window panes to show the artifacts of both. Turns out the aticle stated that SW encoding is superior. So now I went back to using SW encoding.
HW encoding may be faster but not the results I wanted.

Casual home video editing just for FUN since MEP 5.5.4.1 (2006??)

  • MEP 17.0.3.177 & unused Vegas Pro 15
  • Win10 1809 on i5-4690, 8 GB, 250GB 840 EVO SSD, 4TB HDD, Nvidia GTX960 (23.21.13.8813) & an old DVD writer
  • Amateur video equipment: Sony HDR-CX675, JVC GZ-MG330
Scenestealer wrote on 14/02/2019, 12:10

@Tesityr

Thank you for your interesting contribution.

Were your observations based on Hardware encoding with the Default Intel h.264 MP4 Encoder or with the Main Concept H.264 MP4 encoder, or with the respective encoders to .mts files?

A comment I received from Magix support some years ago when it became impossible to HW encode (export) from MEP using Cuda, with any of the Kepler architecture Nvidia cards and newer, was because they could not or did not get the SDK from Main concept to enable HW H.264 export with the newer GeForce chips. I do not know if this was a commercial decision or that they were not happy with the quality at the time.

HW encoding has always run the risk of a quality hit and previously the HW encoders from MC using Cuda, and Nvidia's NVENC chip have had some of the optimisations present in SW H.264 encodes, missing. NVENC previously did not encode B-frames for example. I see the H.265 MC encoder enables B-frames with NVENC.

System Specs: Intel 6th Gen i7 6700K 4Ghz O.C.4.6GHz, Asus Z170 Pro Gaming MoBo, 16GB DDR4 2133Mhz RAM, Samsung 850 EVO 512GB SSD system disc WD Black 4TB HDD Video Storage, Nvidia GTX1060 OC 6GB, Win10 Pro 1809, MEP2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 Premium and prior, VPX7, VPX11. Microsoft Surface Pro3 i5 4300U 1.9GHz Max 2.6Ghz, HDGraphics 4400, 4GB Ram 128GB SSD + 64GB Strontium Micro SD card, Win 10Pro 1903, MEP2015 Premium.