Comments

emmrecs wrote on 11/18/2019, 2:01 PM

@Jenny-Krummel

Welcome to the Magix forums.

Since iTunes files are automatically protected by Apple (to prevent "illegal" copying) I'm pretty certain there is no way in which you can use them "natively" in your slideshow.

Hopefully, another user may know of a solution and be able to guide you. Perhaps your only real option is to find an alternative source of the actual music tracks you wish to use.

I know there are softwares that claim to be able to remove the DRM (Digital Rights Management) protection on these iTunes files but, since such software is a breach of Apple's Terms of Use any such software cannot and should not be posted to any reply here, please.  Any and all such posts will be hidden by one of the moderators.

Jeff
Forum Moderator

Win 10 Pro 64 bit, Intel i7 Quad Core 6700K @ 4GHz, 32 GB RAM, AMD Radeon R7 360 and Intel HD530 Graphics, MOTU 8-Pre f/w audio interface, VPX, MEP, Music Maker, Photo Story Deluxe, Photo Manager Deluxe, Xara 3D Maker 7, Reaper, Adobe Audition CS6 and CC, 2 x Canon HG10 cameras, 1 x Canon EOS 600D

CeBlue wrote on 12/22/2019, 3:43 PM

Actually, Apple allows you to convert your songs to MP3 completely legally (for personal use only obviously). Here are the instructions that can be found at this link from the Apple web site: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204310

Convert songs in your music library

Follow the steps below for your device.

On your PC

Open iTunes for Windows.

In the menu bar, choose Edit > Preferences.

Click the General tab, then click Import Settings.

Click the menu next to Import Using, then choose the encoding format that you want to convert the song to.

Click OK.

Select the songs in your library that you want to convert.

Choose File > Convert, then Create [format] Version.

New song files appear in your library next to the original files.

 

johnebaker wrote on 12/22/2019, 4:29 PM

@CeBlue

Hi

. . . . Apple allows you to convert your songs to MP3 completely legally (for personal use only obviously). . . . .

Did you read the very last paragraph About Copyright in the article you linked to?

Music you purchased and acquired through iTunes Store or Apple Music is Copyrighted to the original creators, you never own the Copyright.

The OP wants to 'break' the music out of iTunes and and use it for a different purpose - this may be illegal depending on the Copyright term and/or Terms of Use for the music.

Depending on the terms of use it is permissible to make copies of music you have purchased for playing on other devices you own or as backup.

John EB

Lateral thinking can get things done!

VPX, MEP Premium, MEP 2016, and earlier versions, Music Maker Premium, Music Maker 2016, 2015.

Running Windows 10 64bit on Intel i7-8700K 3.2 GHz, 16Gb RAM, 1Tb + 2 x 2Tb internal HDD + 60Gb internal SSD, + 6 x 2Tb ext HDDs, Sony FDR-AX53 Video camera, Contour HD 1080 and Sony HDR-AS30V Sports cams.

CeBlue wrote on 12/22/2019, 5:10 PM

Yes, and you conveniently forgot to list the 3rd bullet … there is a permission to use the content for personal purposes. You can also find a link to all the legalize here on that same page https://www.apple.com/legal/internet-services/itunes/us/terms.html where it says:

You may use the Services and Content only for personal, noncommercial purposes (except as set forth in the App Store Content section below).

And yes, it specifically says you are not allowed to remove or 'break' DRM, but you can purchase music DRM-free from Apple (and others), and if you are using iTunes to make/export MP3's of DRM free content you purchased through iTunes, there is absolutely nothing illegal about that - as long as you use the content for personal purposes.

Now, if you create a slide show with someone's music and play it publicly or upload it to YouTube for the whole world to see (and listen to), then yes, that would be a problem. But that's not personal use anymore.

 

 

emmrecs wrote on 12/23/2019, 3:26 AM

@CeBlue

Now, if you create a slide show with someone's music and play it publicly or upload it to YouTube for the whole world to see (and listen to), then yes, that would be a problem. But that's not personal use anymore.

OK.

Unfortunately, in the context of this thread we do not know for certain exactly the circumstances in which the OP wants to "use" the finished slideshow, so all the above caveats remain.

Jeff

Win 10 Pro 64 bit, Intel i7 Quad Core 6700K @ 4GHz, 32 GB RAM, AMD Radeon R7 360 and Intel HD530 Graphics, MOTU 8-Pre f/w audio interface, VPX, MEP, Music Maker, Photo Story Deluxe, Photo Manager Deluxe, Xara 3D Maker 7, Reaper, Adobe Audition CS6 and CC, 2 x Canon HG10 cameras, 1 x Canon EOS 600D

johnebaker wrote on 12/23/2019, 3:33 AM

@CeBlue

Hi

. . . . you conveniently forgot to list the 3rd bullet . . .

If you read my post again you will see that I did not refer directly to any of the bullet points in the article linked to.

To clarify, as the OP did not respond to the topic, we do not know whether the user was trying to break DRM or what the end use / audience would be, hence the remainder of my post took a more generalised 'worst case' scenario and referred to what the OP wanted to do, and that the legality of doing so depended on the Terms and Conditions of use - in this case the linked you provided.

The general comment applies, not only to iTunes and Apple Music, to all music and other media such as images and video whatever the source.

John EB

 

Lateral thinking can get things done!

VPX, MEP Premium, MEP 2016, and earlier versions, Music Maker Premium, Music Maker 2016, 2015.

Running Windows 10 64bit on Intel i7-8700K 3.2 GHz, 16Gb RAM, 1Tb + 2 x 2Tb internal HDD + 60Gb internal SSD, + 6 x 2Tb ext HDDs, Sony FDR-AX53 Video camera, Contour HD 1080 and Sony HDR-AS30V Sports cams.

CeBlue wrote on 12/31/2019, 1:13 PM

@johnebaker @emmrecs

Thank you both - fair enough and completely agree with both of you.