No Hardware Acceleration / Encoding

Comments

johnebaker wrote on 8/5/2018, 1:32 PM

@mojoaudioguru

Hi

. . . . Once Magix dropped CUDA Core encoding, a few years back . . . .

A small correction - it was not Magix who dropped 'CUDA' encoding, it was Nvidia deprecating NVCUVID encoder support in preference to the NVENC encoding.

CUDA is the wrong name for the NVCUVID encoding software in the NVidia drivers - the blame for this lies at NVidia's door, they encouraged developers to call it CUDA which is actually the graphics chipset CUDA cores and driver combination that enables the GPU to be used for general computing functions.

John EB

Lateral thinking can get things done!

VPX, MEP Premium, MEP 2016, and earlier versions, Music Maker Premium, Music Maker 2016, 2015.

Running Windows 10 64bit on Intel i7-8700K 3.2 GHz, 16Gb RAM, 1Tb + 2 x 2Tb internal HDD + 60Gb internal SSD, + 6 x 2Tb ext HDDs, Sony FDR-AX53 Video camera, Contour HD 1080 and Sony HDR-AS30V Sports cams.

mojoaudioguru wrote on 8/5/2018, 1:39 PM

Right. A spade is a spade. No matter what you call it. Besides, I explained this NVidia / Magix, lack of support situation, in that same post. Re-read it if you'd like.

Scenestealer wrote on 8/6/2018, 12:21 AM

Main Concept will not adapt to any NVidia GPUs, and NVidia dropped supporting CUDA Cores

I don't believe this has anything to do with Nvidia. In my experience the Legacy Nvidia cards ie 5xx series and earlier still work for CUDA rendering even with recent drivers.

The issue in MEP is that Magix and Main Concept (who built the encoder Magix previously used as the default) have not got together to support the later Geforce (and AMD) chipsets, with Magix choosing to go the Intel iGPU and QSV route as the default encoder. Note that the MC encoder still can be used with an Intel GPU for HWA encoding if you choose QSV in the advanced encoder settings window.

Magix VPX latest build has now the facility to HW encode H.265 HEVC (only ie no H.264) via the MC encoder (only) by using the NVENC facility with processing being done on a separate hardware layer on the Nvidia GPU. Whilst NVENC has been available on earlier cards and is used by online gamers for realtime encoding, Magix say you should use a 1050 series (or higher) Nvidia card, although some report that it works with some 9xx series Nvidia cards.

I imagine the VPX H.265 HW NVENC encoding will filter down to MEP in due course and can only guess that the current lack of H.264 HW encoding via NVENC is because of Magix current agreement with Intel.

Peter

System Specs: Intel 6th Gen i7 6700K 4Ghz O.C.4.6GHz, Asus Z170 Pro Gaming MoBo, 16GB DDR4 2133Mhz RAM, Samsung 850 EVO 512GB SSD system disc WD Black 4TB HDD Video Storage, Nvidia GTX1060 OC 6GB, Win10 Pro 1909, MEP2016, 2020 (V19.0.1.23) Premium and prior, VPX7, VPX11 (V17.0.2.44). Microsoft Surface Pro3 i5 4300U 1.9GHz Max 2.6Ghz, HDGraphics 4400, 4GB Ram 128GB SSD + 64GB Strontium Micro SD card, Win 10Pro 1903, MEP2015 Premium.

mojoaudioguru wrote on 8/6/2018, 1:40 AM

I have an NVidia GTX 1050Ti, with 4 gig of DDR5 RAM, that did absolutely nothing with either MEP 2017+ and MEP 2018+. Although, it was in my older computer, running Windows 7 Ultimate, with an older Q9550 CPU, (Overclocked to 3.6 GHz), that had no Intel Quick Sync capabilities. So, after finally taking advice from all of you here, I got my stubborn head out of my ass, and built a new 'puter, with an i7-7700K CPU, with the 630 Intel video chipset, 16 gig of DDR4 RAM, and Windows 10 Pro. After realising that the GTX 1050Ti wasn't doing anything at all in the new beast, except for taking up valuable liquid cooling capability space, I took it out. Currently, no GPU exists in my computer. I suppose I could put it back in, but why? Everything functions as it should. Most HD and 2K videos that I create are rendered in almost real time. Albeit, the 4K clips take slightly longer. But I'm happy to get 90 minute wedding videos rendered in 2 hours, rather than the 12 to 18 hours that it used to take, with my old computer set-up. In any case, if Magix & Main Concept do decide to do something in the future, I have a perfectly good GPU sitting in it's box waiting to be reinstalled, at a moment's notice. 😉

Scenestealer wrote on 8/6/2018, 6:31 AM

Hi Mojo

Sounds like you have a setup that is working well for your requirements so indeed why bother with the discreet Nvidia GPU. However as previously discussed, there may be some benefit to other members systems with older or lower end processors and integrated GPU's, for accelerated timeline preview, and encoding of effects during export without full GPU HW encoding.

System Specs: Intel 6th Gen i7 6700K 4Ghz O.C.4.6GHz, Asus Z170 Pro Gaming MoBo, 16GB DDR4 2133Mhz RAM, Samsung 850 EVO 512GB SSD system disc WD Black 4TB HDD Video Storage, Nvidia GTX1060 OC 6GB, Win10 Pro 1909, MEP2016, 2020 (V19.0.1.23) Premium and prior, VPX7, VPX11 (V17.0.2.44). Microsoft Surface Pro3 i5 4300U 1.9GHz Max 2.6Ghz, HDGraphics 4400, 4GB Ram 128GB SSD + 64GB Strontium Micro SD card, Win 10Pro 1903, MEP2015 Premium.

paulsweigert wrote on 8/6/2018, 7:58 AM

I just upgraded to Video Pro X because it says.....

Hardware acceleration Full performance video editing thanks to optimal CPU and GPU usage. Hardware-accelerated encoding and decoding (H.264, H.265). HEVC/H.265 video export is now backed by NVENC support from NVIDIA, which makes it possible for the first time to outsource export processing to the GPU's hardware encoder. Plus, with proxy support and preview rendering, video editing is as smooth as ever.

I may look to purchase a NVidia GTX 1050Ti, 

MikaS wrote on 8/6/2018, 9:52 AM

Thank you mojoaudioguru (and others)! I just got the Intel GPU working... miracles. When it previously took 8x the clip length to export, now it took 0.5x (a 3 minute clip exported in 1.5 minutes). First I had to enable the Intel GPU in BIOS, then install the latest driver for it, and then select it in program settings.

mojoaudioguru wrote on 8/6/2018, 10:11 AM

MikaS: Yes! The difference is incredible! Good luck to you! Paulsweigert: The NVidia GTX1050 is a great GPU. Reasonably priced, and is cost effective. The 4 gigs of DDR5 RAM made my older computer run like an updated machine. But couldn't do much for rendering on an older Q9550 CPU. However, I'm sure it will add to your performance, by allowing the GPU to handle other things, whilst your CPU can focus solely on using all it's resources for rendering. Good luck to you as well. 😉

johnebaker wrote on 8/6/2018, 10:41 AM

@mojoaudioguru

Hi

. . . . The NVidia GTX1050 is a great GPU . . . .

I take it that you recommend this - I am looking at installing a NVidia card - was looking at the 1080 Ti however at ~ 3x the price of the 1050Ti it is too much for what I want - not for MEP or VPX - but Blender which I am learning/using to create some Intros, transitions, effects and Rotoscoping.

It can use the Intel GPU via OpenCl, however there are some issues with some parts of Render Cycles which crash the program.

John EB

 

 

 

Lateral thinking can get things done!

VPX, MEP Premium, MEP 2016, and earlier versions, Music Maker Premium, Music Maker 2016, 2015.

Running Windows 10 64bit on Intel i7-8700K 3.2 GHz, 16Gb RAM, 1Tb + 2 x 2Tb internal HDD + 60Gb internal SSD, + 6 x 2Tb ext HDDs, Sony FDR-AX53 Video camera, Contour HD 1080 and Sony HDR-AS30V Sports cams.

wongck wrote on 8/6/2018, 5:58 PM

The Nvidia 1050 is really just an entry level GPU for that range. The 1080 Ti is far ahead of it, and therefore the multiple times in price.

IIRC, Blender when I tried playing with it last year, my old Nvidia 960 did not help a lot in the rendering as the new engine (last year) also did not use that Nvdia API. Things may have changed now.

Last changed by wongck on 8/6/2018, 5:59 PM, changed a total of 1 times.

Casual home video editing just for FUN since MEP 5.5.4.1 (2006??)

  • MEP 17.0.3.177 & unused Vegas Pro 15
  • Win10 1903 i7-4770 3.4GHz, 32GB, 512GB Nvme, 4TB HDD, Nvidia GTX1070 (26.21.14.3160) & an old DVD writer
  • Amateur video equipment: Sony HDR-CX675, JVC GZ-MG330
mojoaudioguru wrote on 8/6/2018, 6:12 PM

Well John, here's my quandary. After discussing all this about the GPUs in the last few days, I decided, just for giggles and grins, to reinstall my GTX750Ti, with two gig of DDR5. (Not the GTX1050Ti, that we've been discussing) And I rendered an 18 minute 2K video using MEP 2018+, in less than real time. To my utter shock, it rendered using the 'CUDA' cores! I didn't enable QSV on the i7-7700K, and I was dumbfounded. MEP 2018+ actually said 'Utilizing CUDA.' I haven't seen that since MEP 2015+! So, I took it out, and installed the GTX1050Ti, with 4 gig of DDR5, and NOTHING. I had to enable the QSV. I was floored. I put back the GTX750Ti, and got the same results as before. So, I left it in. And, I boxed the 1050Ti. Although it is a great GPU, I'm not understanding what happened. Did Main Concept finally bend? or did MEP enable CUDA support again? Or, am I slowly going mad? I'm working on a lengthy video now, and when I finish it, I'm going to test this all out again. Not having had a GPU in this relatively new computer, I thought I wasn't missing anything. But, I got a bit curious, and put one in. And ironically, it's the older of the two. John, I would say go with the GTX1050Ti, simply because it has more Cores, and 4 gig of the DDR5. It did a good job on my last 10 year old computer. (I had replaced the 750Ti with it, thinking I needed a better GPU. When what I really needed was, a new up-to-date computer, sporting Windows 10) I believe you'll get some great results with it. The extra RAM will unburden your CPU and your regular RAM. In theory, it should keep your 'puter from crashing. But, I do have my CPU overclocked at 11% above specs. Make sure to enable both the GPU and Intel QSV, in the mobo, once installed. Good luck.

Scenestealer wrote on 8/6/2018, 6:57 PM

@paulsweigert

Hardware-accelerated encoding and decoding (H.264, H.265). HEVC/H.265 video export is now backed by NVENC support from NVIDIA

Be aware that this statement can be misleading. The first sentence only applies to timeline preview where the compressed footage is being encoded and decoded to your display. There is no export NVENC HWA for H.264, only HWA for H.265 export.

@mojoaudioguru

I am not sure what you are experiencing with the 750Ti. If you are exporting H.264 using the Main Concept encoder then it will be nearly realtime without HWA ie it exports "software only" much faster than the Intel encoder does.

I have seen " using CUDA" come up in the encoding window before and monitoring the activity on the GPUs via GPUZ utility showed no significant increase in activity over a software render.

@johnebaker

As you have just started using a 4K camera I would go with a GTX1060 with 6GB of VRAM, especially if you are going to get a 4K display for your editing. At 4K playback in tests, I have seen all 6GB being used. It seems to be a sweet spot with price and performance and is also a bit above that recommended by Magix.

Peter

 

 

Last changed by Scenestealer on 8/7/2018, 6:06 AM, changed a total of 1 times.

System Specs: Intel 6th Gen i7 6700K 4Ghz O.C.4.6GHz, Asus Z170 Pro Gaming MoBo, 16GB DDR4 2133Mhz RAM, Samsung 850 EVO 512GB SSD system disc WD Black 4TB HDD Video Storage, Nvidia GTX1060 OC 6GB, Win10 Pro 1909, MEP2016, 2020 (V19.0.1.23) Premium and prior, VPX7, VPX11 (V17.0.2.44). Microsoft Surface Pro3 i5 4300U 1.9GHz Max 2.6Ghz, HDGraphics 4400, 4GB Ram 128GB SSD + 64GB Strontium Micro SD card, Win 10Pro 1903, MEP2015 Premium.

johnebaker wrote on 8/7/2018, 3:55 AM

@wongck@wongck

Thank you both for your suggestions, I will look most likely go with the GTX1060 for the new PC, my laptop is also due for replacement and the one I have been looking at has an Intel i7-8750H and NVidia GTX1060 graphics card.

Makes life much simpler if both are of identical or close to identical specs for processor and GPU.

John EB

Lateral thinking can get things done!

VPX, MEP Premium, MEP 2016, and earlier versions, Music Maker Premium, Music Maker 2016, 2015.

Running Windows 10 64bit on Intel i7-8700K 3.2 GHz, 16Gb RAM, 1Tb + 2 x 2Tb internal HDD + 60Gb internal SSD, + 6 x 2Tb ext HDDs, Sony FDR-AX53 Video camera, Contour HD 1080 and Sony HDR-AS30V Sports cams.

Leon-Couch wrote on 9/11/2018, 7:16 AM

I am considering upgrading my GTX 760 card to a GTX 1080 or higher GTX card. The computer store I'm communicating with says I must go with the Quattro Pro P4000 or higher card to take advantage of the GPU rendering of Vegas 16 (4k @ 60fps at 10 bit, between 9Mbps & 35Mbps on various encoders). Is this true?

I do play some games and the processing power of the GTX is higher than the Quattro, at nearly half the cost. So, must I buy the Quattro to accelarate the video rendering at those high rates, or can I just buy the GTX?

 

johnebaker wrote on 9/11/2018, 7:38 AM

@Leon-Couch

I would suggest you post in the Vegas Pro forum here.

HTH

John EB

 

Lateral thinking can get things done!

VPX, MEP Premium, MEP 2016, and earlier versions, Music Maker Premium, Music Maker 2016, 2015.

Running Windows 10 64bit on Intel i7-8700K 3.2 GHz, 16Gb RAM, 1Tb + 2 x 2Tb internal HDD + 60Gb internal SSD, + 6 x 2Tb ext HDDs, Sony FDR-AX53 Video camera, Contour HD 1080 and Sony HDR-AS30V Sports cams.

Grzegorz-Woniak wrote on 11/19/2018, 11:11 PM

@wongck@wongck

Dziękuję wam za sugestie, będę wyglądać najprawdopodobniej z GTX1060 na nowy komputer, mój laptop jest również do wymiany i ten, na który patrzyłem ma kartę graficzną Intel i7-8750H i NVidia GTX1060.

Znacznie ułatwia życie, jeśli obie są identyczne lub zbliżone do specyfikacji dla procesora i procesora graficznego.

John EB

hej, i have gtx1060. gpu work only if render is nvenc: magix avc, magix hevc-intel,sony intra.

DEREK-YOUNG wrote on 6/20/2019, 4:34 PM

Yes this is an old post but applicable to me with very limited info out there. I am using FastCut. I use accelerated renders. When I render 4k clips, I get artifacts. Little dashes in image. If I render exact same but in 1080 the artifacts disappear. If I render 4k on different computer with software encoding it looks fine. Has anyone seen this? I'm considering a processor upgrade but dont know if that will eliminate the artifacts. My processor is older and has Intel Hd Graphics 4600. Even intel admits quality is less using hardware renders.

mojoaudioguru wrote on 6/21/2019, 1:19 AM

Derek-Young, I built a new computer with an Intel i7-7700K 4.2 GHz processor, then overclocked it to 4.7 GHz. (It's water cooled) I also added 16 gig of DDR4 RAM, and a GTX 1050Ti SC GPU, with 4 gig of DDR5 RAM. This combination allows me to render HD, 2K, and 4K footage without issue. I waited for the longest time to build a new 'puter. I'm glad I did. Employing Magix Movie Edit Pro Plus 2019. I haven't had any issues since the new build. If you have an old processor, chances are, that's your problem. The i7's 630 Quick Sync does the trick. The GTX only helps with the multi-screens. Since NVidia dropped supporting CUDA Cores, life has been a trial with Magix. But, I've been employing it since its debut in 1999. Been a videographer since 1990. I hope this helps. My OS is Windows 10 Pro. (With the latest 'May 2019' upgrade)

johnebaker wrote on 6/21/2019, 3:30 AM

@DEREK-YOUNG

Hi

. . . . I use accelerated renders . . . . render 4k clips . . . . Hd Graphics 4600 . . . .

Can you confirm that the HD4600 is doing the rendering to 4K - the HD4600 does not support this you need a processor with UHD integrated graphics ie UHD520 or later.

John EB

 

Lateral thinking can get things done!

VPX, MEP Premium, MEP 2016, and earlier versions, Music Maker Premium, Music Maker 2016, 2015.

Running Windows 10 64bit on Intel i7-8700K 3.2 GHz, 16Gb RAM, 1Tb + 2 x 2Tb internal HDD + 60Gb internal SSD, + 6 x 2Tb ext HDDs, Sony FDR-AX53 Video camera, Contour HD 1080 and Sony HDR-AS30V Sports cams.

DEREK-YOUNG wrote on 6/21/2019, 11:26 AM

Thanks guys. Well, it says accelerated when rendering and does it quite fast, much faster than my other computer with much better specs. hd4600 has quick sync. Intel confirms this. And I have the most current drivers. which arent very current. hd4600 also outputs 3840x2160 to my desktop. Mojo, thx for confirming you render 4k successfully. Glad your may upgrade went well because it repeatedly killed my c drive and i screwed up my backup on the last go 'round so have to reinstall now, ugh. hence considering new processor. Artifacts could still be due to my different software, fastcut is quite the hoot when you feed it good clips.

PilotCurt3 wrote on 3/17/2020, 6:24 PM

I have the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 and Intel HD Graphics 4600 built into the motherboard. I have been struggling with the "Mixing Down...no hardware acceleration" problem for quite a while. Here is my solution. Go to Windows Settings / Systems / Display. Scroll to the bottom and select Graphic Settings. Click browse and find your Movie Edit Pro Plus program. It should be in your Program Files in the Magix folder. Select the Power Saving Option in the Graphics Specifications.

I am using the Default Codec in Movie Edit Pro Plus under the Import/Export tab in Program Settings (I have tried the Main Concept Codec and it appears that it is using the graphics card for hardware acceleration but the .mp4 file is unreadable.) Be sure that the Hardware encoding box is checked under File / Export movie / Video as mpeg4 / Advanced.

If this does not work for you, check your BIOS and make sure that the Intel graphics card is set as the primary VGA adapter. It was not necessary for me to have a monitor connected to the Intel . Both of my monitors are connected and controlled by the NVIDIA.